A Vampire: the Requiem, Werewolf: the Forsaken and Changeling: The Lost Live Action. Set in the fictional city of New Oskana and ran in Regina, Saskatchewan. Contact the game staff by requiemforregina@gmail.com. Register for additional information.


    The Docks: The Factory

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    Victor

    Posts : 696
    Join date : 2009-05-04
    Age : 38
    Location : Regina

    The Docks: The Factory

    Post  Victor on Wed Jul 16, 2014 2:57 pm

    Controlled by: Valentine Kelly

    Taxes Owed: 130,000


    Last edited by Victor on Sat Feb 14, 2015 3:32 pm; edited 1 time in total
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    Victor

    Posts : 696
    Join date : 2009-05-04
    Age : 38
    Location : Regina

    7. The Yards (Chemical Plant)

    Post  Victor on Wed Jul 16, 2014 2:57 pm

    Description:
    With its proximity to other troubled, service-sector neighborhoods in New Oskana, the casual visitor might expect the Yards neighborhood to have significant troubles of its own. The truth of the matter, though, is that the Yards is almost a model neighborhood, from the responsible functionality of its chemical conglomerate anchor to the quiet respectability of its middle-class residents. It’s a conservative neighborhood, with most of its horror represented by the existential angst its comparatively privileged teenagers sometimes feel, or the shock encountered when it turns out that the guy who lives down the street is actually gay.

    Background:
    The Yards has been an almost idyllic neighborhood for the past 60 years, with almost a television-quality perfection and complacency to its prim housewives and well-kept lawns. Therefore, the occasional aberrations it does experience seem quaint, such as "street gangs" that are just collections of shiftless high-school students instead of the armed, drug-dealing hardcore of the inner city, or the sexual predator who is simply a groper rather than an actual rapist. Still some events have managed to shake this neighborhood to its very core.

    The last major event that happened in The Yards was a major chemical spill. During a busy summer day when the sun was shining and most in the city were finding ways to enjoy the outdoors a tanker that was filled with dangerous chemicals was making its regular route. Only one thing had changed. It seemed that city planning had made several changes and they had built Buffy park right alongside the dangerous goods route. That afternoon the horror began as a traffic light failed causing the semi to veer off into the park and roll spilling its dangerous contents all over the park. 17 people died in the incident and at least 50 more had to spend a great deal of time in the hospital recovering from the incident.

    Previously to that indecent there was a group of Satanists who were practicing in the area and though they mostly only sacrificed small animals to their god they did eventually graduate to people. It was in the winter of 1968 when they kidnapped a young girl named Clare Futch. The authorities were quickly alerted to the disappearance but by the time they actually found the girl in the groups basement she had already been stabbed in the chest and bled out. The young men involved were all covered in her blood and speaking a language that no one could understand. Some people have later concluded that the girl was a willing victim but these theories are generally regarded with a very negative attitude as Clare Futch has become a prime example of what happens when you let cults into a city.
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    Victor

    Posts : 696
    Join date : 2009-05-04
    Age : 38
    Location : Regina

    8. Nor Lock (Industrial Works)

    Post  Victor on Wed Jul 16, 2014 2:57 pm

    Description:
    "Hellish desolation" adequately sums up the composition of the Nor Lock neighborhood, and it’s a striated Hell not unlike that of Paradise Lost, with the first circle butting up against the Purgatory of the Yards and the ninth circle dragging North Lake into its environs. With a minimum of residential space, most of Nor Lock is industrial from the auto plant that dumps its waste into North Lake to the foundry that dumps its waste into North Lake to the plastics plant that dumps its waste into North Lake. It’s all a stinking metal-and-concrete sprawl, with nothing higher than three stories except a few sterile office parks. In the factories’ lunchtime proximity and in the squalid residential areas, local dives abound, and cheap beer is a more common meal than the perfunctory blue plates.

    Background:
    The era of the untarnished working man is over. Once, men could be proud to say they worked assembly-line jobs at the factories, but crooked union delegates and bottom-line management left the factories in the lurch in the late 1970s. Now, a 12-hour day, five days a week is an acceptable schedule on the factory floor, and many of the workers have to resort to cheap meth to keep themselves alert and focused for the last 20 of those hours. Where the meth went, the prostitutes followed, and by the early 1980s, Nor Lock had a reputation as a trough of petty vice. It retains that reputation now, a timeless testament to the fate of the laborer-tradesman.

    Despite the now less than favorable view of this area many living there still see the Nor Lock of old. They see the strong unions who led workers in major strikes against large corporations through the 20's right into the early 70's. Several major strikes have taken place here that have changed how labor is viewed across Canada. In 1945 there was a general strike held in the factories in order to improve working conditions and raise the minimum age of workers. Proud labor leaders such as Jessie Melrose who would move on to become part of city council for close to a decade came from this area of town. Those who grow up around Nor Lock grow up with a strong sense of pride and a strong work ethic.
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    Victor

    Posts : 696
    Join date : 2009-05-04
    Age : 38
    Location : Regina

    9. Lockham (Slums)

    Post  Victor on Wed Jul 16, 2014 2:58 pm

    Description:
    The counterpart to Nor Lock’s squalor, Lockham is where many of Nor Lock’s employees live. It’s a poorly planned neighborhood with obsolete two-and-a-half-family homes jumbled next to dingy apartment complexes and crumbling starter homes. At any given point, half of the lights at the rail stations are burnt out or vandalized. The district’s demographic is predominantly Latin, with the next largest populations split equally among Poles, African Americans, North African Muslim immigrants and various Middle Eastern nationalities. A dwindling population of original owners who bought homes in the neighborhood back before Nor Lock had decayed so irreversibly still live here, too. The streets of Lockham are forever under pothole repair, and the neighborhood needs many new streetlights to replace the stop signs for traffic relief, but the money’s just not there. Here are yards with cars up on blocks and chain-link fences that corral dogs hungry with neglect, and persistent rumors of "the boogeyman" cling a little more tenaciously to the local culture than children’s stories usually do.

    Background:
    In the early 1940s, Lockham was an up-and-coming neighborhood, a pastoral neighborhood of small homes that working men could afford. As the complexion of the factory floor changed, "white flight" occurred, and the neighborhood slowly shifted under the influences of inflation and transitory workers to one of low income and high crime. Lockham was never the high-rise tenement that television fosters as the idea of in-town poverty, but the neighborhood remains a deadend neighborhood where the working poor watch their meager savings slowly spiral into negative equity.

    It was in the 80's when to corporations decided that they could pay people in Lockham to let them dump waste materials in North Lake. For over a decade these people managed to keep it under wraps until an investigative journalist uncovered the story. Eric Cliff broke the news to the world and environmentalists from all around the world were outraged. International protests were organized and the corporations themselves were taken to court. Scientific studies performed on the lake and it was deemed too dangerous to allow swimming in it any longer. The city is still wondering what it should do for the clean up and is questioning what the impact might be if the chemicals ever managed to make their way into the drinking water supply. During the backlash several local companies went under, and just like many many other occasions the large foreign conglomerates seemingly came out with only a few black marks.

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